Skin Type: Combination

You are sometimes prone to breakouts, especially on the forehead and nose, but not usually on the cheeks. If you place a tissue over the skin of your nose, a bit of oil will soak into it. Nose and forehead may sometimes be “shiny.”

Best Massage Oils for Combination Skin:

Jojoba Oil: This is actually a wax, not an oil, so it is a good choice for partially oily skin. Jojoba has properties that are very close to the body’s natural moisturizing system, so it can help skin heal naturally.

Kukui Nut Oil: A non-greasy oil, good for all skin types.

Wheat Germ Oil: This is a heavy oil that is usually mixed with lighter oils. It is high in Vitamin E and is good for healing scar tissue, including that caused by acne. Avoid if you have wheat allergies.

Apricot Kernel Oil: This oil is good for most skin types, and is quickly absorbed, so it won’t leave a greasy residue. It is also high in Vitamin E.

Sunflower Oil: A non-greasy oil that won’t leave behind a greasy film.

Evening Primrose: This is not used on its own, but can be added to other oils. Good for all skin types. Evening Primrose helps to rejuvenate skin cells, and could help heal acne-damaged skin.

Soy Oil: Soy is good for all skin types, and has little smell, which may be a plus for some users.

Avoid These Oils If You Have Combination Skin:

Grapeseed Oil: This oil is a very good moisturizer. Perhaps too good if parts of your skin are naturally oily.

Olive Oil: This is a heavy, greasy oil that may cause breakouts.

Lanolin: This is actually a wax, not an oil, but is best used on dry skin rather than oily skin.

Mineral Oil: This is a petroleum by-product common in many cosmetic products. It dries skin, but not in a beneficial way. It is likely to cause irritation, especially on areas of the combination skin that are naturally drier.

Skin Type: Sensitive

You are often negatively affected by cosmetic products. You are prone to stinging, chaffing, itching, redness and other skin discomforts.

Note: if you have sensitive skin, always do a patch test before using a new product, to avoid large-scale irritation.

Best Massage Oils for Sensitive Skin:

Apricot Kernel Oil: This is a non-irritating oil full of Vitamin E and may help soothe skin inflammations.

Jojoba Oil: This is actually a wax, not an oil. It is non-irritating, making it a good choice for sensitive skin. Jojoba has properties that are very close to the body’s natural moisturizing system, so it can help skin heal naturally.

Calendula Oil: This is one of the best oils for healing skin irritations, making it a good choice for sensitive skin.

Also good (do a patch test to be sure!):

Soy Oil: Soy is good for all skin types, and has little smell, which may be a plus for some users.

Sweet Almond Oil: A non-irritating oil good for all skin types. Contains Vitamin D, which is a healthy nutrient for skin. Avoid if you have nut allergies.

Sesame Oil: A greasy oil, traditionally used in Ayurvedic practices and good for sensitive skin.
Evening Primrose: This is not used on its own, but can be added to other oils. Good for all skin types. Evening Primrose helps to rejuvenate skin cells, so is a good oil to use for maintaining skin, or healing skin damaged by irritation.

Avoid These Oils If You Have Sensitive Skin:

Fractionated Coconut Oil: May irritate sensitive skin.

Cocoa Butter: Has been known to cause irritation in some individuals.

Olive Oil: The experts are divided about olive oil and sensitive skin. Some individuals may have allergies to olive oil, though this is actually rare. But olive oil is a thick and greasy product that can possibly cause irritation by clogging pores, and so should be avoided or at least diluted before using on sensitive skin.

Mineral Oil: A petroleum by-product that dries skin and can cause irritation.

Buying Massage Oils

Massage oils may be found at health food stores that sell vitamins and other supplements. They may also be bought from spa shops or specialty skin care shops such as Allergy Free Me. There are also many websites that sell massage oil, and you can find several of these with a quick Google search. Check the ingredients when buying your oil to be sure it contains only the ingredients you desire. While there are oils available that have already been mixed and blended with other oils, many massage therapists recommend buying a base oil and mixing it yourself.

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